Salmon River Stream Productivity Monitoring 2011-2013

Salmon RiverPrepared by Kenvin Pellett of the BC Conservation Foundation Sections of the Salmon River and tributaries have been enriched with different combinations of fertilizers and application locations for over 20 years.  A review of nutrient enrichment of the Salmon River watershed was recently conducted by Pellett as a tool for better understanding the effects of nutrient treatments to the Salmon River as well as to guide future enrichment activities. Salmon River Stream Productivity...

Salmon River Diversion Letter of Support

Mon. Dec. 9,2013 Charles Reid. CEO of BC Hydro 333 Dunsmuir. Vancouver. BC V6B 5R3 Dear sir: The Comox Valley chapter of the Steelhead Society of BC believes strongly that the Salmon River Diversion should be decommissioned. The Campbell River Salmon Foundation first identified fish passage problems in December of 2007. In 2008. BC Hydro devised a fish passage decision framework, which led to three years of inactivity and time wasted. In June of 2010, following the drowning of five elk over a two year period. BC Hydro began building an elk fence, completed in November 2011. which was definitely a positive move. however, in the process of building the fence. Hydro personnel discovered the extremely poor condition of the concrete portion of the canal, which was originally built in 1953. Because of the state of disrepair, Hydro has not used the diversion since June of 2010. Steelhead Society members and Campbell River volunteers question the whole concept of stealing water from one river to supplement another, especially from a river such as the Salmon with its rich fish producing capacity. The concept was wrong in the first place and in the context of global warming would be even more wrong now. Also, from a fiscal responsibility point of view, the cost of repairs would run into tens of millions of dollars, which we perceive as wasted dollars for a facility which stole water and compromised fish populations from the beginning. Should the Salmon River Diversion be decommissioned, fish stocks in the Salmon River system would gain unrestricted access to an additional forty-two kilometers of prime spawning and rearing...

Adequate fish passage on the Salmon River needs to happen now

Rupert Gale had this to say in the Courier-Islander on May 25, 2012 in response to this article published by Stephen Watson of BC Hydro in the Courier-Islander on May 16, 2012. The Campbell River Salmon Foundation stands behind Rupert in his view that the current fish passage facilities at the Salmon River Diversion are inadequate.  The CRSF has had ongoing talks with BC Hydro about the Salmon River Diversion with regards to providing an effective fish passage, and were optimistic that the Dam was being considered for decommissioning.  If Stephen Watson’s comments about keeping the dam in service are true, then resources will need to be provided to allow for the construction of adequate and effective fish passage for Steelhead and Salmon...

Salmon River Diversion

Dan McLennan, Courier-Islander Published: Wednesday April 21, 2010 A fish passage project under consideration at BC Hydro’s Salmon River Diversion could be the most significant enhancement project involving the Campbell River Salmon Foundation (CRSF), as well as the first test of a new direction for BC Hydro. A partnership including CRSF, Hydro, the Sayward Fish and Game Club, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the BC Ministry of Environment (MOE) is exploring ways to help the Salmon River’s famous steelhead and coho get around the diversion. “It really is special,” said CRSF chair Mike Gage. “It’s so significant. We’ve taken on a lot of projects, but none of it compares to what is going to be available to anadromous fish once this is completed, 40 kilometres worth of anadromous fish water. How do you put a value on that?” The Salmon River Diversion sits about 58 kilometres upriver from tidewater. It was built in the 1950s to divert water into the Campbell system for power generation. It wasn’t a barrier to fish when it was built because there was a natural barrier downstream, but MOE removed that barrier in the 1970s. “After that was blasted out, over a period of years, fish began to arrive at the facility,” said BC Hydro’s Stephen Watson. “So there was concern about them getting upstream of the facility and fish getting back down.” “Steelhead especially, are what the Salmon River is famous for,” Gage said. “Over the years since that blockage was removed, these fish stocks have grown stronger and stronger and moved up to where they’re starting to be held up at this...