Ten Tips for Clean and Green Boating

Prevent oily discharges from the bilge. Keep your engine well tuned to prevent fuel and oil leaks. Secure an oil absorbent pad or pillow in your bilge and under your engine where drips may occur. Check the pads often, do not let them clog the bilge pump, and dispose of them as hazardous waste at a marina or local hazardous waste collection center. Spill-proof your oil changes. For oil changes, use an oil change pump to transfer oil to a spill-proof container. Wrap a plastic bag or absorbent pad around the oil filter to prevent oil from spilling into the bilge. When fueling, stop the drops! Prevent fuel spills by filling fuel tanks slowly and using absorbent pads or rags to catch drips and spills. Don’t “top off” or overflow your fuel tank. Leave the tank 10% empty to allow fuel to expand as it warms. Do not add soap. Never use soap to disperse fuel and oil spills. It increases harm to the environment, and it is illegal. Minimize boat cleaning and maintenance in the water. If possible, save maintenance projects for the boatyard. When performing work on the water minimize your impact by containing waste. Use tarps and vacuum sanders to collect all drips and debris for proper disposal. Reduce toxic discharges from bottom paints. Minimize the discharge of heavy metals found in soft-sloughing antifouling paints by using a less toxic, or nontoxic antifouling paint. Use only non-abrasive underwater hull cleaning techniques to prevent excessive paint discharge. Remember, dry storage reduces the need for antifouling paints and saves money. Dispose of hazardous waste properly. Dispose of paints,...

C.R. Salmon Foundation provides green for pinks

Courier-Islander Published: Friday, March 09, 2012 The Campbell River Salmon Foundation has provided a cheque for $4,000 to support the Pinks for the Pier program. “This quick action is a terrific show of community support for the program,” says Mayor Walter Jakeway. “We really appreciate the Salmon Foundation’s ongoing support for our community’s interest in fishing.” The Pinks for the Pier project involves “imprinting” juvenile pink salmon in pens for two to three weeks prior to releasing them into Discovery Passage. Imprinting guides fish back to the release location two years later, which provides angling opportunities for residents and visitors. Email to a friendEmail to a friendPrinter friendlyPrinter friendly Font: AddThis Social Bookmark Button The Pinks for the Pier program is a City of Campbell River partnership with Campbell River Indian Band and the federal government’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. “The Salmon Foundation wants to see this program continue, and we welcome their regular support,” the Mayor sums up. One dollar of every $10 boat launch fee paid at the Discovery Harbour Marina funds the...

A success story for sayward fish and game club and CRSF

Chinook salmon for the Salmon A success story for sayward fish and game club and CRSF By Dan MacLennan, Campbell River Courier-Islander March 9, 2012 Promising chinook returns to the Salmon River are good news to members of the Sayward Fish and Game Club. Mike Gage says chinook were found last fall as far upriver as the diversion dam, almost 60 kilometres from the estuary “That’s the first time to our recollection that chinook salmon have ever been that high up the river,” said Gage, who is the President of the Campbell River Salmon Foundation which has contributed money to the project. “They were right up to the diversion dam. The other two species that have made it that far up in large numbers have been steelhead and coho, and now we’ve got chinook there so we’re pleased that the work of the Sayward Fish and Game Club has paid off.” Gage attributes the chinook success to a brood stock capture in the fall of 2007 near the estuary by members of the club. The eggs were raised to the eyed stage at the Sayward Hatchery and then transferred to the Quinsam Hatchery for further rearing. Hatchery staff released roughly 100,000 smolts up near the dam in late April 2008. Four years after the brood capture, Gage said at least six mature chinook were seen just below the dam. “Because we released these smolts in 2008 at the diversion dam, they’ve been imprinted on the river all the way down to the estuary,” he said. “We were very pleased to see the fish returning and how far up the...

Adding Another Piece to Salmon Survival Puzzle

What do young salmon eat? Is there enough food for them when they leave the rivers and streams and enter the ocean? In 2006, Dave Ewart of the Campbell River-based Quinsam Hatchery approached the BC Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences (BC-CAHS) with these two key questions. Knowing the answers would allow hatchery staff to release coho when food was readily available thereby greatly increasing their chances for survival and returning to local waters. Thanks to two years of generous financial contribution totaling $25,000 from the Campbell River Salmon Foundation, the Discovery Passage Plankton Monitoring and Juvenile Salmon Assessment project was able to complete its work of ground-breaking research and field work in conjunction with local Fisheries and Oceans staff, and the Atlegay Fisheries Society. In 2009, the third year of the project, funding was reduced, putting the research in jeopardy. The Campbell River Salmon Foundation, concerned about the survival of local wild salmon stocks, was one of the local groups that stepped up and provided the funding necessary to see the project to a successful end. The next steps will include further data compilation, the first steps towards publishing the results. BC-CAHS is an independent Campbell River-based not‐for‐profit society started in 2005.  The staff of ten conducts research and provides services relating to aquatic health issues of both cultured and wild marine species. The fully equipped and state of the art laboratory facility supports this crucial work. For more information, visit the BC-CAHS website: www.cahs-bc.ca.   An example of what juvenile coho eat taken from Discovery Passage (photo courtesy of BC-CAHS)....